People who lost their homes in California are suing PG&E, accusing the energy company of negligence and blaming it for the wildfire

https://www.businessinsider.com/ap-pge-sued-over-massive-northern-california-wildfire-2018-11


california fire
Araya
Cipollini cries near the remains of her family’s home burned in
the Camp Fire, Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018, in Paradise,
California.


John
Locher/AP Photo



  • People who lost homes in California’s deadliest and
    most destructive wildfire sued Pacific Gas
    & Electric Co. Tuesday, accusing the utility of negligence
    and blaming it for the fire.
  • The fire that killed at least 48
    people
    and devastated the Northern California town of
    Paradise was a “direct and legal result of the negligence,
    carelessness, recklessness, and/or unlawfulness” of PG&E,
    the lawsuit said.
  • PG&E told state regulators last week that it experienced
    a problem on a transmission line in the area of the fire just
    before the blaze erupted.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — People who lost homes in California’s
deadliest and most destructive wildfire sued Pacific Gas &
Electric Co. Tuesday, accusing the utility of negligence and
blaming it for the fire.

PG&E did not maintain its infrastructure and failed to
properly inspect and manage its power transmission lines,
according to the lawsuit filed in state court in California by
more than two dozen fire victims.

The fire that killed at least 48 people and devastated the
Northern California town of Paradise was a “direct and legal
result of the negligence, carelessness, recklessness, and/or
unlawfulness” of PG&E, the lawsuit said. The lawsuit seeks
compensation for the plaintiffs’ losses and unspecified damages.

An email to PG&E was not immediately returned.

Officials have not determined the cause of the blaze.


Read more:
The death toll from California’s
fires keeps rising, with thousands of homes destroyed in Malibu
and Northern California


California fire
A
firefighter keeps watch as the Woolsey Fire burns a home in
Malibu, Calif., Friday, Nov. 9, 2018. A Southern California
wildfire continues to burn homes as it runs toward the sea. Winds
are blamed for pushing the fire through scenic canyon communities
and ridgetop homes.


Ringo
H.W. Chiu/AP Photo



PG&E told state regulators last week that it experienced a
problem on a transmission line in the area of the fire just
before the blaze erupted.

In its filing Thursday with the state Public Utilities
Commission, it said it had detected an outage on an electrical
transmission line. It said a subsequent aerial inspection
detected damage to a transmission tower on the line.

A landowner near where the blaze began, Betsy Ann Cowley, said
PG&E notified her the day before the blaze that crews needed
to come onto her property because the utility’s wires were
sparking.


Read more:
Photos show how
the wildfire burned the town of Paradise, California to the
ground

PG&E President Geisha Williams told the Chico
Enterprise-Record on Tuesday that it was too soon to determine if
sparks from a transmission line ignited the fire.

She said the sparks are one of several “options” investigators
are reviewing.

The fire charred roughly 200 square miles. But officials said
crews were able to keep it from advancing toward Oroville, a town
of about 19,000 people. It has destroyed about 7,700 homes.